New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014 – Finalists announced

NZ Post Book Awards logoThe New Zealand Post Book Awards finalists for 2014 have been announced! Predictably there’s a lot of The Luminaries. I’m excited to see Michele Leggott in the Poetry section, and I think the General Non-Fiction is going to be the interesting award. Don’t forget to vote for the People’s Choice award. Here’s the media release:

New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014 finalists announced - Quintessential Kiwi Character Shines Through

The quintessential New Zealand character comes to the fore in the finalists for the New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014, announced today. Selected from 150 entries, the judges say the finalist books capture the essence of the country’s psyche — not just in place and people, but by capturing what makes us tick as New Zealanders.

The judges said they were surprised at how relatively easily they agreed on their choices of finalists. Convenor of the judging panel, Miriama Kamo, says, “As fairly opinionated and confident people we surmised that these finalists were of such quality that they stood up and spoke for themselves. Having said that, not every selection came easily as there were many excellent books from which to choose our finalists.”

The finalists include eight non-fiction books on a variety of themes, among them a biography of Labour Prime Minister Norman Kirk, a lavishly photographed journey around our coastline, a search for a family history that was inspired by the Christchurch earthquakes and a re-examination of the Pike River mine tragedy.

Fiction finalists include, not surprisingly, Eleanor Catton’s Man Booker Prize winner The Luminaries, set on the West Coast. The three other fiction finalists are Anne Kennedy’s The Last Days of the National Costume — a gripping tale of illicit love, passion and embroidery and The Bright Side of my Condition by Charlotte Randall, based on a true story of four escaped Norfolk Island convicts who were deposited on The Snares — a group of islands south of Stewart Island. Damien Wilkins’ book Max Gate departs this year’s New Zealand theme, with an insightful novel on the death of Thomas Hardy.

The four Poetry finalists include two first-time authors — Caoilinn Hughes for her book Gathering Evidence and Marty Smith with Horse with Hat. Auckland author Michele Leggott’s Heartland follows some of her own movements and moments — to Devonport, to Australia and to the north of the country. Poet Laureate Vincent O’Sullivan’s Us, then explores experience and memory, belief, ways of seeing, other worlds we find set against our own – and individual lives within the frame of a collective history.

“Poetry in New Zealand is in fantastic shape with a number of brilliant new poets making themselves known, Caoilinn Hughes and Marty Smith among them,” says Miriama.

The New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014 judging panel comprises acclaimed New Zealand artist, Dick Frizzell; award-winning Radio New Zealand presenter, Kim Hill; poet and novelist, Elizabeth Smither; and literary critic, Peter Simpson. The panel is convened by broadcaster Miriama Kamo.

Miriama said that the judges congratulated all the finalists on their achievements in being named on the Awards’ shortlist. “We had to make our selections from a very strong field this year. Every author should be proud to be in such excellent company. From new authors to established prize-winning writers, all contributed to a stellar year in New Zealand writing.”

“We would also like to congratulate the publishers of these finalists’ titles. The design and production standards are very high, with some stunning works in the Illustrated Non-fiction category in particular. It’s great to see that the importance of the design, images, typography and paper stock are considered as important as the words themselves. These are all beautiful books and they will be a pleasure to read in years to come.”

People’s Choice opens today

The ever-popular People’s choice award is the public’s opportunity to vote for their favourite book of the year. Eligible books must be written by New Zealand authors and published in New Zealand within the period of 1 June 2013-31 May 2014. Readers can vote online or in a book store. Voting opens on Wednesday, 23 July and closes on Friday, 15 August.

Prizes

A significant prize pool will see the overall winner of the New Zealand Post Book of the Year award receive $15,000. Winners of the four category awards will each receive $10,000; People’s Choice $5,000; Nielsen Booksellers’ Choice $2,500; and each of the winners of the three New Zealand Society of Authors Best First Book awards, $2,500.

National Poetry Day

New Zealand poetry will be celebrated with National Poetry Day on Friday, 22 August with more than 60 colourful events planned for around the country. Aspiring poets, poetry lovers and established poetry writers can enjoy a range of events that will capture imaginations and provide inspiration to not only write their own verse, but also to enjoy listening to poetry and/or performing a piece of poetry.

Winners announced on 27 August

The winner of the New Zealand Post Book of the Year will be announced at a glittering ceremony at Wellington’s Te Papa Museum on Wednesday, 27 August. Also announced will be the four category winners, People’s Choice winner and the Nielsen Booksellers’ Choice award. The three winners of the New Zealand Society of Authors Best First Book awards, announced on Wednesday, 16 July, will be presented with their prizes.

The New Zealand Post Book Awards are managed by Booksellers New Zealand and sponsored by New Zealand Post. The awards are also supported by Creative New Zealand and Book Tokens New Zealand.

The finalists for the New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014, by category, are:

Fiction

  • The Bright Side of my Condition by Charlotte Randall, Penguin Books
  • The Last Days of the National Costume by Anne Kennedy, Allen & Unwin
  • The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton, Victoria University Press
  • Max Gate by Damien Wilkins, Victoria University Press

Poetry

  • Gathering Evidence by Caoilinn Hughes, Victoria University Press
  • Heartland by Michele Leggott, Auckland University Press
  • Horse with Hat by Marty Smith, Victoria University Press
  • Us, then by Vincent O’Sullivan, Victoria University Press

 Illustrated Non-fiction

  • Coast: A New Zealand journey by Bruce Ansley & Jane Ussher, Random House NZ (Godwit)
  • Greer Twiss: Sculptor by Greer Twiss, Dr Robin Woodward & Haru Sameshima, Ron Sang Publications
  • New Zealand and the First World War 1914-1919 by Damien Fenton, Penguin Books in association with the Ministry for Culture and Heritage
  • Promoting Prosperity: The art of early New Zealand advertising by Peter Alsop and Gary Stewart, Craig Potton Publishing

General Non-fiction

  • A History of Silence by Lloyd Jones, Penguin Books
  • Peter McLeavey: The life and times of a New Zealand art dealer by Jill Trevelyan, Te Papa Press
  • The Mighty Totara: The life and times of Norman Kirk by David Grant, Random House NZ
  • Tragedy at Pike River Mine by Rebecca Macfie, Awa Press

Nielsen Booksellers’ Choice

  • Beyond the State: New Zealand state houses from modest to modern, by Bill McKay, Andrea Stevens & Simon Devitt, Penguin Books
  • Molesworth: Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station by Harry Broad and Rob Suisted, Craig Potton Publishing
  • The Beginner’s Guide to Hunting and Fishing in New Zealand by Paul Adamson, Random House NZ
  • The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton, Victoria University Press

WORD Christchurch Festival sounds amazing!

So the new WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival sounds like it’s going to be AMAZING. Kristin Hersh! Ruth Reichl! NoViolet Bulawayo!

I’d definitely suggest you get along! Check out today’s media release:

New Look Festival Returns Bigger Than Ever to Brighten Up Christchurch’s Inner City

The WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival today launches its most ambitious programme yet, with more than 100 writers, thinkers, commentators and performers from New Zealand and around the world appearing in 68 events in the heart of the city.
 
World-renowned food writer Ruth Reichl, indie musician and memoirist Kristin Hersh and Luke Harding – foreign correspondent for the Guardian and author of books on Edward Snowden and Julian Assanges WikiLeaks – are among the line-up of writers taking part in WORD Christchurch, formerly known as the Christchurch Writers’ Festival, which runs from 27 to 31 August at the brand-new Rydges Hotel on Latimer Square, the nearby Transitional Cathedral and at The Physics Room in the Old Post Office building.
 
They are joined by a rich and varied group of novelists and spoken word performers, including our very own Man Booker Prize winner Eleanor Catton, the multi-million-copy bestselling British author of The Thirteenth Tale, Diane Setterfield, two-time US National Poetry Slam champion Anis Mojgani, acclaimed New York novelist Meg Wolitzer and Man Booker Prize shortlisted Zimbabwean novelist NoViolet Bulawayo.
 
WORD Christchurch Literary Director, award-winning novelist Rachael King, says the programme has something for everyone.
 
“Were thrilled to be launching the most varied programme in the festivals 17-year history. Its both international in its scope and intensely local, with sessions that are very relevant to Christchurch audiences, including the Cardboard Cathedral book launch, featuring architect Shigeru Ban himself, a panel based around the Christchurch recovery and visiting US expert Reed Kroloff on rebuilding broken cities. We also have a panel on writing tough stories, featuring Gaylene Preston, creator of Hope & Wire, the TV drama about the earthquakes.
 
“We have introduced a fringe programme, where a less mainstream audience will find entertaining and stimulating events, such as a panel on the power of superhero comics, experimental poetry, local songwriters discussing their craft, and a theremin performance,” says Ms King.
 
Another new addition to the festival is the Saturday free family events at Rydges Latimer, with international and New Zealand childrens writers, giving Christchurch kids the chance to get up close to their favourite writers.
 
Ms King says it was important to the events ethos to hold the festival in the heart of Christchurch.
 
“We want to remind Cantabrians and visitors that the inner city can be a great place to be, and to capture the unique character of Christchurch in its transitional state.”
 
Tickets to all events are on sale now from dashtickets.co.nz. The full programme can be viewed at www.wordchristchurch.co.nz
WORD Christchurch logo

Special events snapshot

Taste morsels of the weekend literary feast to come and be entertained, delighted and moved as seven of the festival’s international writers speak, read, sing and perform on the topic of brightness in the opening event, The Stars Are Out Tonight. Friday 28 August, 7.30pm, Transitional Cathedral, hosted by John Campbell.
 
WORD is proud to launch Shigeru Ban: Cardboard Cathedral in the Transitional Cathedral, with Ban himself in conversation with author Andrew Barrie. It tells the story of the buildings remarkable design and construction and outlines the world-famous, award-winning architects concerns about post-disaster responses and the role architecture can play in re-establishing a community. Wednesday 27 August, 7.30pm.
 
Join adept and articulate MC Joe Bennett for The Great New Zealand Crime Debate as he chairs a raucous night of argument and repartee while a stellar line-up of debaters, including Christchurch mayor Lianne Dalziel and writers Steve Braunias and Meg Wolitzer, argues the moot, ‘Crime doesn’t pay’. The debate is followed by presentation of the 2014 Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel. Saturday 30 August, 8pm, Rydges Latimer.
 
WORD Christchurch presents a Schools Programme this year, with three sessions at St Margarets College, where children from all over Christchurch will travel to see a selection of international and local writers of novels and poetry, including an award-winning illustrator and a comics artist. Free event for all schools, book via admin@wordchristchurch.co.nz.
 
Australian philosopher Damon Young explores one of literatures most intimate relationships, that between writers and their gardens, at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. Saturday 30 August, 10am, Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre.
 
New Zealand writer Elizabeth Knox, winner of the recent New Zealand Post Award for Young Adult Fiction, presents the inaugural Margaret Mahy Lecture, entitled ‘An Unreal House Filled with Real StormsSunday 31 August, 10am, Rydges Latimer.

Two superb Ngāi Tahu storytellers, Tā Tipene ORegan and Tahu Pōtiki, with chair Paulette Tamati-Elliffe, recount gripping and memorable tribal stories from creation myths to tūpuna tales, and contemporary stories from Kaikoura to Rakiura and from Hokitika to Horomaka in rero Pūrākau – Ngāi Tahu StorytellingSunday 31 August, 11.30am, Rydges Latimer.

WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival warmly thanks its major funders The Press, Christchurch City Council, Creative New Zealand and Canterbury Community Trust; festival and session sponsors Duncan Cotterill, PwC, Te Runanga o Ngāi Tahu, New Zealand Institute of Architects, Beca, All Right?, Foodstuffs, Academy Funeral Services, Hawkesby & Co, Harcourts Gold, Heritage Management Services and Publica; our festival patrons and supporters, partners and supporting publishers.

Why I agree you should be embarrassed to read YA books

So, this article from Slate, entitled Against YA: Adults should be embarrassed to read children’s books has caused something of a wild storm throughout the book community. But, with (insincere) apologies to the many commentators who hated it, I really agreed with it. Basically it’s a call to those who persist with the “I only read YA. I even have a t-shirt” line to perhaps think about it in a different way.

(I want this t-shirt though:

…anyway, as I was saying.)

Our reading habits will and should change over a lifetime. Reading is so personal and so communal we almost inevitably make the personal political (or at least extrapolate the personal opinion into the wider opinion). The serious literary types pooh-pooh the YA types. The paranormal romance types laugh at the serious literary types who can’t afford to eat. The YA types accuse others of being literary snobs, Dan Brown readers have no idea we’re looking down on them, and everyone laughs at those who read nothing but Mills & Boon.

It’s the nature of opinion.

And opinion changes.

For example as a kid I absolutely loved Roald Dahl, I read most of his books over and over. I still adore him and thoroughly enjoy reading his books. But the profundity of them has changed. To read them is enjoyable, and doing so reminds me why my 10 year old self related to the lovely characters, but my present self does not.

In my 20′s I was enamoured with “serious literature”: prize winners, difficult reads, often quite avant-garde stuff. I read it, not because I necessarily enjoyed doing so but because I was an English student and I wanted to have the experience of reading it, I wanted to push myself, to read for more than enjoyment and satisfaction and fun. I was, and in many ways still am, a literary snob.

Now, in my 30s, I still read a lot of those types of books – mostly prize winners – but I do so with one eye on my enjoyment levels. My time is becoming more limited, I don’t have hours to spend reading so I try to balance it more. So I read (and love) a bit of YA, I laugh and marvel at really good children’s picture books, I delve into the odd piece of easy reading… I’ve even discovered the joys of speculative fiction. And I still go head over heels for serious adult literature.

So what I took from this article was not the headline (which is obvious click bait, and dammit, why don’t I do that with my blog and stop being so high and mighty, on that note, see above), what I took was don’t let YA literature be all you read. Books for kids and teens are for kids and teens and we should be honest about that, and acknowledge that that’s what makes them good books. If I wanted to write a YA book but I didn’t write it for YAs then I would not be doing my job well, at all. If you’re not the target audience then of course those books can still speak to some part of your soul, my 15 year old soul was thrilled by The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood but in very different ways from my 25 year old soul and my 36 year old soul. And I imagine my 72 year old soul will again view it in a completely different way.

Also, just to really make you all mad, I didn’t think The Fault in Our Stars was all that great. It was fine but, jesus, it was so written for teenagers and, bless them, they are invariably annoying. We all were. That’s why we can relate.

funny-meme-slang-teenagers