Book Watch, New Zealand Herald on Sunday – 13 July 2014

The Martian

By Andy Weir, Random House

This science-fiction adventure thriller is up there with the best in edge-of-your-seat reads, combining imagination, science and a healthy dose of humour. Mark Watney is a botanist and astronaut stranded on Mars, left alone to survive on the Red Planet because of a mixture of bad luck and catastrophe. Will he make it back to Earth? It’s no surprise that a movie adaptation is already in the works.

Sand

By Hugh Howey, Random House

A new world and a new story from Howey, the best-selling writer of the Wool trilogy. The author’s strength is his prodigious imagination and he makes use of it again with Sand, combining apocalyptic vision with a story of family and survival. Like Wool this is a highly enjoyable read; I became so immersed I could practically feel the grit and wind.

Purgatory

By Rosetta Allen, Penguin

A fantastic new book from a talented New Zealand author, Purgatory is based on the 1865 Otahuhu murders. Exploring ideas of spirituality, colonial dispossession and the dehumanising effects of poverty and alcohol, the story moves between Ireland and New Zealand, and between bereavement and redemption. Allen’s expressive story-telling will appeal to readers looking for the best home-grown narratives.

At War with Satan

By Steff Metal,  Grymm & Epic Publishing

Another homegrown author but with a completely different focus, At War with Satan is a fantasy tale in the best tradition of Terry Pratchett and Robert Rankin, with a lot of heavy metal thrown in. Plenty of puns and gentle jokes at the expense of various musical genres keep this a fast and furious read. The author’s love of the subject matter is infectious, making the war between heaven and hell anything but grim.

My Book Watch column for 13 July 2014, courtesy of the New Zealand Herald on Sunday.

scan of printed Book Watch column

WORD Christchurch Festival sounds amazing!

So the new WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival sounds like it’s going to be AMAZING. Kristin Hersh! Ruth Reichl! NoViolet Bulawayo!

I’d definitely suggest you get along! Check out today’s media release:

New Look Festival Returns Bigger Than Ever to Brighten Up Christchurch’s Inner City

The WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival today launches its most ambitious programme yet, with more than 100 writers, thinkers, commentators and performers from New Zealand and around the world appearing in 68 events in the heart of the city.
 
World-renowned food writer Ruth Reichl, indie musician and memoirist Kristin Hersh and Luke Harding – foreign correspondent for the Guardian and author of books on Edward Snowden and Julian Assanges WikiLeaks – are among the line-up of writers taking part in WORD Christchurch, formerly known as the Christchurch Writers’ Festival, which runs from 27 to 31 August at the brand-new Rydges Hotel on Latimer Square, the nearby Transitional Cathedral and at The Physics Room in the Old Post Office building.
 
They are joined by a rich and varied group of novelists and spoken word performers, including our very own Man Booker Prize winner Eleanor Catton, the multi-million-copy bestselling British author of The Thirteenth Tale, Diane Setterfield, two-time US National Poetry Slam champion Anis Mojgani, acclaimed New York novelist Meg Wolitzer and Man Booker Prize shortlisted Zimbabwean novelist NoViolet Bulawayo.
 
WORD Christchurch Literary Director, award-winning novelist Rachael King, says the programme has something for everyone.
 
“Were thrilled to be launching the most varied programme in the festivals 17-year history. Its both international in its scope and intensely local, with sessions that are very relevant to Christchurch audiences, including the Cardboard Cathedral book launch, featuring architect Shigeru Ban himself, a panel based around the Christchurch recovery and visiting US expert Reed Kroloff on rebuilding broken cities. We also have a panel on writing tough stories, featuring Gaylene Preston, creator of Hope & Wire, the TV drama about the earthquakes.
 
“We have introduced a fringe programme, where a less mainstream audience will find entertaining and stimulating events, such as a panel on the power of superhero comics, experimental poetry, local songwriters discussing their craft, and a theremin performance,” says Ms King.
 
Another new addition to the festival is the Saturday free family events at Rydges Latimer, with international and New Zealand childrens writers, giving Christchurch kids the chance to get up close to their favourite writers.
 
Ms King says it was important to the events ethos to hold the festival in the heart of Christchurch.
 
“We want to remind Cantabrians and visitors that the inner city can be a great place to be, and to capture the unique character of Christchurch in its transitional state.”
 
Tickets to all events are on sale now from dashtickets.co.nz. The full programme can be viewed at www.wordchristchurch.co.nz
WORD Christchurch logo

Special events snapshot

Taste morsels of the weekend literary feast to come and be entertained, delighted and moved as seven of the festival’s international writers speak, read, sing and perform on the topic of brightness in the opening event, The Stars Are Out Tonight. Friday 28 August, 7.30pm, Transitional Cathedral, hosted by John Campbell.
 
WORD is proud to launch Shigeru Ban: Cardboard Cathedral in the Transitional Cathedral, with Ban himself in conversation with author Andrew Barrie. It tells the story of the buildings remarkable design and construction and outlines the world-famous, award-winning architects concerns about post-disaster responses and the role architecture can play in re-establishing a community. Wednesday 27 August, 7.30pm.
 
Join adept and articulate MC Joe Bennett for The Great New Zealand Crime Debate as he chairs a raucous night of argument and repartee while a stellar line-up of debaters, including Christchurch mayor Lianne Dalziel and writers Steve Braunias and Meg Wolitzer, argues the moot, ‘Crime doesn’t pay’. The debate is followed by presentation of the 2014 Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel. Saturday 30 August, 8pm, Rydges Latimer.
 
WORD Christchurch presents a Schools Programme this year, with three sessions at St Margarets College, where children from all over Christchurch will travel to see a selection of international and local writers of novels and poetry, including an award-winning illustrator and a comics artist. Free event for all schools, book via admin@wordchristchurch.co.nz.
 
Australian philosopher Damon Young explores one of literatures most intimate relationships, that between writers and their gardens, at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. Saturday 30 August, 10am, Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre.
 
New Zealand writer Elizabeth Knox, winner of the recent New Zealand Post Award for Young Adult Fiction, presents the inaugural Margaret Mahy Lecture, entitled ‘An Unreal House Filled with Real StormsSunday 31 August, 10am, Rydges Latimer.

Two superb Ngāi Tahu storytellers, Tā Tipene ORegan and Tahu Pōtiki, with chair Paulette Tamati-Elliffe, recount gripping and memorable tribal stories from creation myths to tūpuna tales, and contemporary stories from Kaikoura to Rakiura and from Hokitika to Horomaka in rero Pūrākau – Ngāi Tahu StorytellingSunday 31 August, 11.30am, Rydges Latimer.

WORD Christchurch Writers & Readers Festival warmly thanks its major funders The Press, Christchurch City Council, Creative New Zealand and Canterbury Community Trust; festival and session sponsors Duncan Cotterill, PwC, Te Runanga o Ngāi Tahu, New Zealand Institute of Architects, Beca, All Right?, Foodstuffs, Academy Funeral Services, Hawkesby & Co, Harcourts Gold, Heritage Management Services and Publica; our festival patrons and supporters, partners and supporting publishers.

Three Quick Reviews

Here’s some quick looks at other books which have passed before my eyes recently.

 WellywoodStyling Wellywood by Kate O’Keefe, available on Amazon

Jess has returned home to Wellington from her big OE in London, and is going into business as a personal stylist with her best friend Morgan. Throw in a bit of snobbery, two good looking men and a sad back story, and some “hi-jinks with a message” should ensue.

Styling Wellywood has a promising premise but it just doesn’t deliver. The main character is seriously unlikeable, and the overall storyline is too predictable to really deliver any punch. Do young NZers really suffer this level of cultural cringe anymore? Unfortunately this book just wasn’t to my liking.

Dating Westerners cover imageDating Westerners: tips for the new rich of the developing by Richard Meros, Lawrence and Gibson

A dating guide for the nouveau riche of the developing world, looking to “break into” the West via love. Truly. Dating Westerners is alternately hilarious and completely weird, which pretty much sums up the entirety so far of Richard Meros’ publishing portfolio.

Dating Westerners is the book rejected for funding by Reactive/Creative New Zealand (both the application and rejection letter can be seen in $30 Meat Pack). Put air quotes wherever you see fit in that sentence.

Seriously, I don’t know what more to say!

The Possession of Silver cover imageThe Possession of Silver by Corey Leigh, available on Amazon

A hybrid fantasy/pirate novel for kids and young adults, The Possession of Silver follows our eponymous hero and budding pirate, Silver, in a hunt for treasure on a very strange island.

The tone of this book is a little odd, not always hitting the mark and jumping around a little too often to be entirely convincing to its target audience. However it’s pulled along by a quick and original plot, with enough surprises to keep me reading to the end.

Book Review: Ad Lib by Thomasin Sleigh

Ad Lib cover imageAd Lib by Thomasin Sleigh, Lawrence and Gibson, ISBN 9780473274849, RRP$23

Right from the epigraph I had an idea of where Ad Lib is going, with two quotes: one from TS Eliot and one from Kim Kardashian. As I got further into the story it became clearer and clearer how these two, seemingly juxtaposed people, were perfect roles for the deeply thought out journey that Sleigh was taking me on.

Ad Lib follows Kyla Crane, daughter of celebrity Carmen Crane who has died suddenly. Carmen was supposed to have been starting to film a reality TV show and her manager and the networks are now keen to have the show follow Kyla. And so a camera crew appears in her house, “friends” she doesn’t quite remember start calling, and a status of celebrity is suddenly conferred upon her.

To say Ad Lib is lyrical and literary is almost beside the point – it is both of those things while being imbued with a strong sense of exactly how low-brow celebrity and reality television works in our wider culture. There are strange touches such as a camera crew that acts as a Greek chorus, and Carmen Crane’s sordid tale of celebrity à la Judy Garland. This overwhelming sense of culture clash kept me unsettled as a reader while drawing me further and further into Kyla’s story.

Her mother was beautiful in these printed photographs. Before anybody had looked at her, she was still beautiful.

What is celebrity and how does it change those who feel its sticky fingers? What about those who seek it out? Sleigh moves dreamily between these questions, sometimes giving the reader clear clues and sometimes keeping us in the dark. Kyla’s grief becomes submerged in the “story” of her show.

Ad Lib is a surreal read, intriguing and beautiful, leaving more questions behind than answers.

Book review: At War With Satan by Steff Metal

At War With Satan book cover image At War With Satan by Steff Metal, ISBN 9781496030887available from Amazon, Kobo and Smashwords – see author’s website for details.

You know what’s awesome right now? (Amongst a raft of other things.) Self-published books are getting WAY better. In the last couple of months I’ve been sent a number of self-published books and, without exception, they’ve all been good reads, well-written and, in my opinion, worth the admission (retail price, that is). At War With Satan was one of these and I am thrilled I got the chance to read it. Gavin is a drummer*, lives in a small English village and dreams of being in a heavy metal band with a heavy metal girlfriend. Next thing you know he’s playing in a great heavy metal band, has a great heavy metal girlfriend… and is caught up in the war between heaven and hell. Because you can’t have everything.

“Army? I wasn’t aware we had an army.” “We don’t. Amassing a legion of loyal and blood-hungry soldiers of the Lord wasn’t high on the church charter this year.” “What do you suggest we do?” The Deacon sighed. “We’d better start with the youth group. They’re an enthusiastic bunch.”

I really enjoyed reading this story. Steff Metal’s writing is enthusiastic, wry and, on the whole, pleasingly polished. And there is a laugh out loud moment around every corner (or turn of the page).

Lucy slammed her legal pad down on the table. Somewhere in the universe, a kitten died.

I did have a few small quibbles, namely: the section in hell probably goes on a bit long and needs tightening up, plot-wise; the location of “small village England” feels chosen for the wider appeal rather than the familiarity of the author – I would have been happy with “small village New Zealand” to be honest; the Goth/Emo vs Heavy Metal was a little too stereotype-happy; and a slightly more ironical framing of the classic “metal sexism” would have been welcomed by this reader. These are small though, none of these seriously detracted from my enjoyment. At War With Satan has a definite Terry Pratchett/Robert Rankin/Neil Gaiman vibe and that’s a high compliment. Needless to say, I recommend this book to fantasy lovers, heavy metal fans (you’ll love it, you know you will), anyone who was a teenager in the early 90′s, and anyone who wants to see what good reads are out there beyond the traditional publishing model. Steff Metal is a writer I’ll be keeping an eye on.

*As the good Terry Pratchett put it: ” ‘I hits ‘em with de hammers,” said Lias, one of nature’s drummers.’ “

A big thank you from BookieMonster

Wow, I can’t believe I started my Givealittle Fundraiser five days ago and I’ve already had 24 donations and have more than doubled my goal. I am so humbled by the support I’ve had and thank you so much to people who have donated, shared the link, sent me messages, shared their stories and just generally been awesome.

So awesome, that I have pretty much been like this all week.

Cas from Supernatural thank you gif

My fundraiser is still open so please keep sharing with your networks and with anyone you think might be interested, would like to support or would be interested in talking to me! Exceeding my goal means I can spend more time with the right people, I can afford to set up domains and webhosting right away, and I can visit more places.

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